< Back     Home     Next >
The Coin Galleries: Jahangir

Jahangir was the son of Akbar by his Rajput queen, Princess Jodhabai of Amber. Among the Mughal emperors, he was perhaps the greatest patron of the fine arts, in which he took a great personal interest. Mughal miniature painting perhaps achieved its greatest height under his patronage. We see a similar flowering in numismatic art also, as Jahangir introduced several portrait type coins, along with his celebrated Zodiac series.

Jahangir

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Gold mohur, Ajmer
Weight: 10.83 gm. Diameter: 21 mm Die axis: 1 o'clock
Jahangir enthroned, holding wine goblet /
Radiate sun, surrounded by legends in four compartments
      AH date 1023 (= 1614-15 CE), regnal year 9
One of the few Mughal portrait coins.

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Gold mohur, Agra
Weight: 10.73 gm. Diameter: 21 mm Die axis: 1 o'clock
Humped bull standing right (representing Taurus) within radiate circle /
Legend with AH date 1030 (= 1621-22 CE), regnal year 16
Jahangir issued an attractive series of coins in gold and silver representing the twelve signs of the Zodiac. His son Shah Jahan later ordered all these coins melted, accounting for their extreme rarity now.

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Silver rupee, Ahmedabad
Weight: 11.01 gm. Diameter: 18 mm Die axis: 12 o'clock
Legend, Persian couplet /
Legend, including year 2 (of Jahangir =1606-07), month Tir
In this very early coin of Jahangir, we already see the signs of his emerging style ... the letters are thickening and there is a beautiful filigree "background." The coin names him by his pre-accession name of Salim.

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Silver rupee
Weight: 11.37 gm. Diameter: 20-21 mm Die axis: 1 o'clock
Legend /
Legend
A nice example of the beautiful Jahangiri style, with the words of the legends resting on a "carpet" of flowers. The coin has no mint name and no date.

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Silver rupee
Weight: 11.24 gm. Diameter: 20.5 mm Die axis: 5 o'clock
Legend nur-ud-din jahangir shah akbar/
Legend, with mintname Kashmir, regnal year 7 and month Azar

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Silver jahangiri
Weight: 13.61 gm. Diameter: 21 mm Die axis: 5 o'clock
Legend /
Legend, with AH date 1020 (=1611-12 CE) and mint Kashmir
At one point, Jahangir experimented with a new denomination, in which the silver weight was 20% higher than in the rupee; this new coin was called the Jahangiri. This coin, minted in Kashmir, is an example ... note the weight of the coin. Later, a 25% overweight coin, the sawai (sawa means one and a quarter), was also tried (see next coin). Neither of these experiments was popular with the traders and so the coinage returned to the normal rupee standard.

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Silver sawai, Lahore
Weight: 14.07 gm. Diameter: 25 mm Die axis: 8 o'clock
Legend, with AH date (10)17 /
Legend, with RY 4
The couplet on this coin reads ba-dahr bad rawan ta falak buwad dar daur ba-naam-i-shah jahangir sikka-i - lahore (by the name of Shah Jahangir, the coin / stamp of Lahore will remain current in the epoch, up to heavens in the universe). (Thanks to Shailen Bhandare and Sanjay Garg for reading the legend.)

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Silver rupee, Qandahar
Weight: 11.41 gm. Diameter: 21 mm Die axis: 6 o'clock
Legend, including AH date 1025 = 1615-16 /
Legend, including mintname Qandahar and RY date 11
A beauriful example of the beautiful "thick" Jahangiri style, with the words of the legends resting on a "carpet" of flowers and a high relief.

Jahangir (Muhammad Nur-ud-din Salim), 1605-27, Silver rupee, Qandahar
Weight: 11.39 gm. Diameter: 20 mm Die axis: 4 o'clock
Legend, including AH date 102(9) = 1619-20 /
Legend, including mintname Qandahar and RY date 15
A later example of the same type of slightly poorer style but of tremendously high relief. The main letters are raised more than 1 mm over the flan (the overall thickness of the coin is 4 mm).
Jahangir with Nur Jahan

Nur Jahan, in the name of Jahangir, 1627, Silver rupee, Patna
Weight: 11.41 gm. Diameter: 20 mm Die axis: 2 o'clock
Legend, including AH date 1037 and inverted heart-shaped ornament or privy mark /
Legend, including regnal year 22 (of Jahangir)
In the waning years of his reign, Jahangir lost himself in drink, and allowed his queen Nur Jahan to effectively run the administration of the empire. This coin is tangible proof of Nur Jahan's power, as she places her own name on the coin, although nominally the issuer is Jahangir. The legend reads:"By authority of Shah Jahangir, gold gained a hundred beauties by the name of Nur Jahan Badshah Begum." Upon his accession, Shah Jahan made it a capital crime to use these coins and ordered them all melted, accounting for their rarity now.
© CoinIndia
All Rights Reserved Copyright Policy
< Back     Home     Next >